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A fun Saturday night

December 5, 2010
tags: ,

lathe and swarf

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9 Comments leave one →
  1. Richard McKenney permalink
    December 5, 2010 3:46 am

    Dad had been saving for years to get a lathe, finally he gets the biggest lathe he could afford, and it takes him two days to assemble, using lots of brute force, ignorance and rawhide mallet.
    After the two days of battling with his machine the man stands victorious every knuckle bandaged and bloody. He puts a one inch bar in the chuck then screw up the tailstock, he throws the lead screw into gear, his pulse is pumping and he does a little dance, so excited to see the metal peeling of the bar like and automatic apple peeler.
    So exited he runs inside to get Mum to show her what his labours have created, they’re both exited and jump up and down holding hands, such mechanical poetry. Mother is gobsmacked and proud of her man, then says “that’s so beautiful dear, but what are you going to do with all those curly things?”

    Boom! Boom!
    Richard

  2. Somer permalink
    December 5, 2010 5:50 am

    It taks so much work these days to make a good metal tooth pick.

  3. December 5, 2010 3:15 pm

    rather festive I thought; what with father christmas and his swarfes, oh sh*t it’ts dwarfes.

    Chr*st on a toboggan, how un PC can a fellow be in one post.

    I’ll get my coat.

  4. Lee Samuelson permalink
    December 5, 2010 8:24 pm

    Now let’s see what carbide tooling will do.
    Lathes under 16″ get bothered when called upon to make small chips instead of swarf, or spagetti (as my wife calls it).
    My 13X40 Harrison is a bit light compared to the 32X150 VDF I swung in the oilpatch.
    Lee in frozen Alberta

    • December 5, 2010 8:40 pm

      Hi Lee. It’s been a while. I hope you’re doing well.

      Yeah, I use carbide tools almost exclusively now. The insert types are really convenient, with a fresh cutting edge available by just spinning the insert 60 degrees to the new side of the triangle. They cost a bit, but sure are nice to use. Leaded steels are nice to cut too, when the strength of a good alloy isn’t needed.

  5. December 5, 2010 8:39 pm

    I think they smell good. Thanks, Paul

  6. Lee Samuelson permalink
    December 10, 2010 12:00 pm

    Hello Pete.
    Colder than Celcius today.
    Somewhere in my bookmarks, and hopefully notebook of needful (HA) things is the name/adress of a company that handles HSS inserts for occasions where Carbides “won’t cut it”. I’ll try forthe info and post it here.
    Lee in insulated coveralls.

  7. Lee Samuelson permalink
    December 10, 2010 9:58 pm

    Pete,
    Lee again.
    see: http://www.arwarner.com for HSS inserts.
    What size tooling do you use? Mine are TNMG332. Kennametal posi-neg holders. Rejuvenation by grinding a long/short or whatever negative rake on the worn tip. Useful when chewing through hard spots, scale, 1-pass welds. (Build-ups should have at least 3 passes to keep the weld machinable and reduce stresses.)
    Valenite boring bars.
    Hertel had a Fix-Perfect (did I get that right? gotta check as I wanna get me some – used them at my last job for fine finishing) line of tooling that used 4 face milling cutters rotated 90 degrees.
    Kennamtetal brazed-on 999 works on hardened steels when grinding or exotic ceramic are the other choices. Took a coupla thou’ from the bore of a $5000.00 ball bearing. Fine fragile angel hair. Kept a dial gauge against the tool to keep up with tip wear.
    What make, size is your lathe?
    Lee, back to resto/rebuilding 1 660 Oliver from 2.

    • December 12, 2010 1:06 pm

      Hi Lee. My lathe is a Birmingham 12×36. Not the biggest or the stiffest lathe, but it is great for motorcycle parts. I wanted one that was big enough to cut flywheels and skim brake drums. For inserts, I buy various types from Rutland or Travers Tool. I’ve never needed to cut ceramics but those Kennametals sound nice.

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